Posts Tagged ‘tarrytown’

It’s not an accident that three of the five fastest growing cities are in Texas. It’s more like destiny.

They say the Lone Star State has four seasons: drought, flood, blizzard and twister. This summer 97% of the state was in a persistent drought; in 2011 the Dallas-Fort Worth area experienced 40 straight days in July and August of temperatures of 100° or higher. The state’s social services are thin. Welfare benefits are skimpy. Roughly a quarter of residents have no health insurance. Many of its schools are less than stellar. Property-crime rates are high. Rates of murder and other violent crimes are hardly sterling either. So why are more Americans moving to Texas than to any other state? Texas is America’s fastest-growing large state, with three of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country: Austin, Dallas and Houston. In 2012 alone, total migration to Texas from the other 49 states in the Union was 106,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Since 2000, 1 million more people have moved to Texas from other states than have left.

As an economist and a libertarian, I have become convinced that whether they know it or not, these migrants are being pushed (and pulled) by the major economic forces that are reshaping the American economy as a whole: the hollowing out of the middle class, the increased costs of living in the U.S.’s established population centers and the resulting search by many Americans for a radically cheaper way to live and do business.

To a lot of Americans, Texas feels like the future. And I would argue that more than any other state, Texas looks like the future as well — offering us a glimpse of what’s to come for the country at large in the decades ahead. America is experiencing ever greater economic inequality and the thinning of its middle class; Texas is already one of our most unequal states. America’s safety net is fraying under the weight of ballooning Social Security and Medicare costs; Texas’ safety net was built frayed. Americans are seeking out a cheaper cost of living and a less regulated climate in which to do business; Texas has that in spades. And did we mention there’s no state income tax?

There’s a bumper sticker sometimes seen around the state that proclaims, I WASN’T BORN IN TEXAS, BUT I GOT HERE AS FAST AS I COULD. As the U.S. heads toward Texas, literally and metaphorically, it’s worth understanding why we’re headed there — both to see the pitfalls ahead and to catch a glimpse of the opportunities that await us if we make the journey in an intelligent fashion.

Orginal article by: Tyler Cowen with Time Magazine

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Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308



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Taking care of an older family member or friend can be stressful. But so is being that person. One wonderful way to ease the stress burden on both of you: Help the person close to you define and preserve his or her legacy.

“Legacy” may not be a word most of us use in everyday conversation, but it’s a concept people tend to give considerable thought to once they head north of their 60s and 70s. Shaping and understanding your legacy refers to sorting out what your life has meant, and what kind of memories of you are apt to live on after you die.

What a person learns and leaves is as individual as his fingerprints. But I found some heartening insights into common themes in this new research from Priceless Legacy, a company that turns interviews with older adults into life stories in print or video format. An analysis of its projects shows that the top five life lessons shared by people ages 65 to 104 are:

  1. The simple things matter most.
  2. Humor and time cure most pains.
  3. There’s more satisfaction in giving than getting. Service to others is the most satisfying activity.
  4. Choose your spouse carefully. It will be your most important decision.
  5. Work hard and in a field or role that you enjoy.

I love this list for several reasons:

  • It shows that you don’t have to be a president or a superstar to leave a legacy of experience and wisdom to impart. All life experience counts…and the “ordinary” experiences seem to count most.
  • It’s a nice playbook on how to live life.
  • It makes a handy template, or at least a starting point, for possible insights to explore with your loved ones about their own life discoveries.
  • I love any reminder in any form that includes the message “humor helps.”
  • Not least, it should make anyone who’s a caregiver feel pretty good. According to these elders, the odds are good that you’ll one day look back on your caregiving as a rewarding part of your life: Simple things (and by extension, simple deeds, simple gifts) matter. Service to others is the most satisfying activity.

How to help someone recognize her legacy is largely a process of investing time. It can be as simple as making time to listen and asking thoughtful questions. One tip: Look over old photos and documents to evoke a story. Learn more simple ways how to help older adults create a lasting legacy—and you won’t regret it. You’ll probably both enjoy it, and you’ll both feel grateful to bring it into the open.

Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308

Original Article by: Paula Spencer, Caring.com

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Back to school means early mornings and quick breakfasts. Use some of these tips to boost your kid’s brain power and to make the most of his or her school day!


Check out the video here.


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I know I am in the right business when I get to drive folks around Austin, looking at incredible homes, on a 75 degree day in February.  Wow.

I showed 5 houses to a dear friend from California this morning.   She, like many others, is choosing to make Austin home after retiring in California.  The cost of living, weather (hey- not as great but she is in Northern California) and people are driving her to Austin.  We looked at homes in Pemberton Heights, Tarrytown and the Westlake area ranging in price from $1,000,000- $1,500,000.  We saw an awesome array of houses- 2 on Lake Austin!!

As I always tell Buyers, it only benefits you to see as many houses as possible, so that when you walk into the right one, you just know.  She was thrilled with what we saw.  When her houses sell in California, she’ll be back, checkbook in hand.  Again, not a bad gig.

Hope you are enjoying Super Bowl Week! Who are you rooting for? Are you, or anyone you know, moving to or around Austin? Call me! xoxo

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I am watching the BCS National Championship and am mourning the fact that college football season is coming to an end.  I come from a football family.  My grandfather, Clint Small, played for the University of Texas, as did my father and brother in law; my brother played for Vanderbilt.  There is nothing greater than fall football in Austin, Texas.  I think about the time and physical commitment the young men make to be on a team. Makes me want to do the same for my own business.  Get to the National Championship like LSU and Alabama.

The company I work with has amazing tools- it is all in how you use them.  Consider the “Market Update”- up to date information about every zip code in this country.  I focus on 78703.  It is the neighborhood in which I grew up and currently live.  Click to put your own zip code in and find out (or confirm) why it is so great.  You can also compare zip codes.  Are you thinking of moving? Compare where you live now to your new zip code.

I like to set my business up 90 days out.  I know myself and can work with 4 to 5 buyers and 4 to 5 sellers at a time.  Do you need to be on my radar?

Congrats to Bey and Jay! Blue Ivy Carter!!!

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