Feeds:
Posts

Archive for the ‘Houses’ Category

Thank you, Matt and Kelsey – a kind testimonial indeed…

“Martha was the greatest! Prompt, attentive, and knowledgeable; what else do you want in a Realtor?!?!?! Her enthusiasm was second to none. Within 10 minutes of walking in our front door, she had plenty of suggestions for what needed to get done so we could maximize our sales…and she was RIGHT! Because of Martha’s ideas/suggestions, we had viewings within hours of the property hitting the market (we even had a couple before it went public)! She didn’t hesitate to fight for our asking price; there was no indecision on her part. Quick with suggestions and how to counter. Her follow through was amazing. Every step of the closing process she was there to make things easy for us to comprehend and execute. You’re losing money if you don’t allow Martha and her team to take care of your home selling needs!”

Matt & Kelsey Klein
August 2014

Read Full Post »

As the great Mark Twain once wrote, “I can live for two months on a good compliment.” Thank you to my amazing clients, Caroline and Mark, for this gem: 
 
“We recently bought a home here in Austin and used Martha Small Homes and Horizon Bank to complete the deal. From start to finish, the level of professionalism, attention to detail and comfort level we had as a family was phenomenal. 
Buying a house is a stressful thing, but Chris (Mortgage consultant) solved problems quickly and efficiently and gave solutions without causing any panic on our end. 
Martha and her staff where there to guide us along the way in the right moments. She was on call when we needed her, attended meetings and inspections and she continued to help us after we closed on our new home.

I would recommend Martha Small Homes and Horizon Bank to anyone who wants to buy a house in the Austin area.”

 
 

 

Read Full Post »

710 Meriden A Front House, Martha Small Homes, Real Estate Austin Martha Small710 A Meriden- Martha Small Non MLS Listing

710 A Meriden – $549,000

  • Exceptional location in Deep Eddy only minutes to Downtown Austin and Zilker Park
  • 2BR, 2.5BA, 2LIV + 1DIN with covered porches
  • Open floor plan built by Eix & Blackwell in 2006
  • Tall ceilings, abundant windows and modern finishes
  • Many rooms pre wired for stereo and tv
  • Seasonal downtown views  from master and master deck
  • Entrance to one car garage off Hearn
  • HOA with next door unit only – very low costs
  • Casis, O Henry and S.F. Austin High Schools

Please contact me for showings and more information

Martha Small – 512-587-0308 – Martha@MarthaSmallHomes.com – MarthaSmallHomes.com

Read Full Post »

It’s not an accident that three of the five fastest growing cities are in Texas. It’s more like destiny.

They say the Lone Star State has four seasons: drought, flood, blizzard and twister. This summer 97% of the state was in a persistent drought; in 2011 the Dallas-Fort Worth area experienced 40 straight days in July and August of temperatures of 100° or higher. The state’s social services are thin. Welfare benefits are skimpy. Roughly a quarter of residents have no health insurance. Many of its schools are less than stellar. Property-crime rates are high. Rates of murder and other violent crimes are hardly sterling either. So why are more Americans moving to Texas than to any other state? Texas is America’s fastest-growing large state, with three of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country: Austin, Dallas and Houston. In 2012 alone, total migration to Texas from the other 49 states in the Union was 106,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Since 2000, 1 million more people have moved to Texas from other states than have left.

As an economist and a libertarian, I have become convinced that whether they know it or not, these migrants are being pushed (and pulled) by the major economic forces that are reshaping the American economy as a whole: the hollowing out of the middle class, the increased costs of living in the U.S.’s established population centers and the resulting search by many Americans for a radically cheaper way to live and do business.

To a lot of Americans, Texas feels like the future. And I would argue that more than any other state, Texas looks like the future as well — offering us a glimpse of what’s to come for the country at large in the decades ahead. America is experiencing ever greater economic inequality and the thinning of its middle class; Texas is already one of our most unequal states. America’s safety net is fraying under the weight of ballooning Social Security and Medicare costs; Texas’ safety net was built frayed. Americans are seeking out a cheaper cost of living and a less regulated climate in which to do business; Texas has that in spades. And did we mention there’s no state income tax?

There’s a bumper sticker sometimes seen around the state that proclaims, I WASN’T BORN IN TEXAS, BUT I GOT HERE AS FAST AS I COULD. As the U.S. heads toward Texas, literally and metaphorically, it’s worth understanding why we’re headed there — both to see the pitfalls ahead and to catch a glimpse of the opportunities that await us if we make the journey in an intelligent fashion.

Orginal article by: Tyler Cowen with Time Magazine

Preview Orginal Article Here

Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308

 

Read Full Post »

Austin is used to being named to nationwide lists as a great city to live. A Forbes columnist has placed Austin among the 10 up-and-coming global cities as the best incubators for entrepreneurs.

“The capital of Texas has been buzzing for a few years now … Big events like South by Southwest and the Film + Interactive Festival have fueled creativity and start-up activity,” the article by Patrick Hull said in its praise of Austin.

Austin is among three U.S. cities mentioned as new global entrepreneur hotspots, including Richmond, Va., and Raleigh/Durham, N.C.

As for the other entrepreneur engineds, Forbes mentions two cities are in South America, two in the Far East and two others, surprisingly, in former East Bloc countries: Moscow and Kiev, Ukraine. Sydney, Australia rounds out the list.

The University of Texas at Austin recently made a list of the best schools for entrepreneurs.

In an exclusive article for subscribers, Austin Business Journal recently published a report on how a number of business incubators are becoming the engine for entrepreneurial growth in the region. Not a subscriber? Follow this link to sign up for four free issues of ABJ.

Orginal Article By: Greg Barr with Austin Bussiness Journal

 

Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308

 

Read Full Post »

Interest rates on mortgages for pricey homes have dropped below those on smaller mortgages, an event that lending executives say has never happened before.

Borrowing rates for so-called jumbo mortgages, which are too big for government backing, historically have been set higher than rates on what are known as conforming loans, which are backed by Fannie Mae, FNMA -3.70%Freddie MacFMCC -2.70% or government agencies.

But in the past two weeks, the relationship has flipped, a combination of interest-rate volatility, government policy and banks flush with cash that are enjoying lower funding costs, making jumbo mortgages an attractive investment for them.

The average 30-year fixed-rate conforming mortgage was at 4.73% last week, according the Mortgage Bankers Association, compared with 4.71% for the average jumbo 30-year fixed-rate mortgage.

Executives say the inversion in the so-called spread, or difference, between jumbo and conforming loans is unprecedented. “In my 30-year career, I’ve never seen nonconforming loans priced below conforming loans,” said Brad Blackwell, executive vice president of Wells FargoWFC -0.18% Home Mortgage, the nation’s largest mortgage company.

Jumbo mortgages are those that exceed the $417,000 limit for loans eligible for backing by mortgage companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, though the limits rise to as high as $625,500 in more-expensive markets such as Los Angeles, New York and Washington.

Before the housing bubble burst six years ago, jumbo mortgages over the past two decades typically had rates at least 0.25 percentage point above conforming loans, but that widened sharply after 2007, reaching a peak of 1.8 percentage points in 2008, according to HSH.com, a financial publisher. The rate difference between the two stood at 0.5 percentage point as recently as last November.

For adjustable-rate mortgages, the disparity between jumbo and conforming loans is even starker. Rates on certain “hybrid” adjustable-rate jumbo mortgages that have a fixed rate for five or seven years are as low as 0.75 percentage point below conforming loans.

“I’ve had situations where I’ve told clients, ‘You don’t need to borrow within the [conforming] limit. I can get you a lower rate if you borrow a little more,’ ” said Rolan Shnayder, director of new-development lending at H.O.M.E. Mortgage Bankers in New York.

Conforming loans have become more expensive because federal officials, in a bid to reduce the outsize footprint of Fannie and Freddie, have raised the fees those companies charge to lenders, which translates into higher mortgage rates.

Meanwhile, interest-rate volatility has driven up yields on mortgage bonds issued by Fannie and Freddie as investors brace for a slowdown in the Federal Reserve’s bond-buying program, which has included those mortgage bonds. That has boosted rates on conforming loans.

Jumbo mortgages, meanwhile, are increasingly kept on banks’ balance sheets, which means prices aren’t usually set by bond markets. “Banks have more deposits than loans today, so the desire to put that money to work, as well as the fact that it’s at a very low cost, allows us to make [jumbo] loans at a very good interest rate,” said Mr. Blackwell.

Mark Cunningham, 39 years old, who works as a program manager for an aerospace company, received a fixed rate of around 4.6% for a 30-year jumbo mortgage in late July through Navy Federal Credit Union for a newly built four-bedroom home in Ashburn, Va. The loan required just a 10% down payment.

“We were very happy. We still haven’t seen anything that competes with what we’ve got,” said Mr. Cunningham.

Navy Federal, which said it is currently offering jumbo loans at the same rate as conforming loans, said jumbos account for around 3% of its mortgages.

Banks have long courted jumbo borrowers because they tend to have deeper pockets. Banks use their relationship with better-off clients to sell them other products, such as brokerage accounts and credit cards.

“These are superpremium borrowers. They represent great cross-sell opportunities,” said Keith Gumbinger, vice president of HSH.com.

But recent interest-rate turmoil is making it easier for large banks such as Wells Fargo & Co. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. to woo those borrowers. “We’re in a world where their cost of funds is still very, very low,” said Bob Walters, chief economist at Quicken Loans.

Lou Barnes, a mortgage banker in Boulder, Colo., was competing Tuesday to keep a client from going to Wells Fargo, which was offering a fixed rate of 4.625% on a 30-year mortgage with a $750,000 balance.

“Commercial banks are just desperate to book an asset that will pay something,” said Mr. Barnes. He had offered a rate of 4.75%, which was roughly the same as the conforming rate Tuesday.

When rates stood below 4.5%, banks weren’t as likely to bid aggressively for jumbo mortgages because they weren’t eager to hold those loans on their books, said Paul Miller, banking analyst with FBR Capital Markets.

But he says the current trend could hold as long as rates stay at current levels or rise even higher.

Mr. Blackwell, the Wells Fargo executive, said the current inversion between jumbo and conforming rates could last “for the foreseeable future” so long as banks’ cost of funds stays at its current level and loan demand doesn’t rise sharply.

Jumbo loans with the lowest rates are available only to a relatively exclusive slice of borrowers who have pristine credit, large down payments, lots of assets and low debt loads relative to their incomes.

Banks also are getting more comfortable because housing prices have been rising. “On a risk-adjusted basis, this is a decent return. The quality of loans being originated today is very high,” said Stew Larsen, who runs the mortgage banking division of Bank of the West.

Some $8.3 billion in jumbo mortgages were packaged into securities during the first half of 2013, more than in the previous three years combined but just a sliver of the $281 billion in jumbo securitizations in 2005, according to Inside Mortgage Finance.

Preview orginal article here

Orginal article by:

NICK TIMIRAOS

Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308

Read Full Post »

145 acres of untouched land in West Austin has hit the market

 

One of the last large undeveloped tracts on Shepherd Mountain overlooking Lake Austin is being marketed nationwide — the first time the property has been for sale in 26 years.

The exclusive listing for the 145 acres, which are being billed as an unprecedented offering of pristine land in West Austin. Perched on a bluff near the Pennybacker Bridge on Loop 360 and Courtyard Drive, the prime property with breathtaking views has been coveted for years by many a developer. But the answer from the owner has been the same time after time for the last two decades: the land isn’t for sale.

Until now.

A preliminary plat is in place for 70 residential lots, The site is near “high-end residential neighborhoods and and home to executive decision makers, upper level managers, and allows easy access to major Austin thoroughfares,” it states.

“There are significant barriers to entry for development in West Austin, with land use restrictions in place along Capital of Texas Highway (Loop 360) and RR 2222 to preserve the environment and Hill Country terrain. Much of the land is permanently preserved, including the Balcones Canyonlands Preserve, Wild Basin Preserve and the Bull Creek Watershed.”

Most of the land is in the Lake Austin watershed, with a small portion in the Coldwater Creek watershed, according to the offering.

Orginal article by: By Shonda Novak

American-Statesman Staff

Preview orginal article here

Compliments of: Martha Small | Austin Portfolio Real Estate | 512.587.0308

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: